Do Amano Shrimp Bury Themselves? Suicidal Fun?

Jan 19, 2021

Do Amano Shrimp Bury Themselves?

If you have noticed your Amano going AWOL, then it could be because of several reasons. The fact that they are mysterious can amaze you what they are doing when going rogue. It is known that most of their time; they are too busy feeding off the algae in your tank. This is a great sight to behold when your Amano shrimps are doing what you put them in for, but what to do when they go missing? Do Amano shrimp bury themselves?

So, let’s dwell on more of it in this article.

Do Amano Shrimp Bury Themselves?

Amano shrimps aren’t known for digging but, Amano shrimps are amazing creatures that will go into hiding by burying themselves. Factors like high water temperature, molting, lack of food, too much brightness in the tank, or hiding from bigger fishes could be the reason for burying themselves.

You might also like to read:

Do Amano Shrimp Eat Moss? Guide To Amano And Moss

Do Amano Shrimp Eat Baby Shrimp? Ruthless Amano!!

Will Amano Shrimp Eat Cherry Shrimp?

Reasons Behind Amano Shrimps Burying Themselves.

  • High water temperature
  • Molting
  • Intimidation
  • Lack of food
  • Lack of plants
  • Bright lights
  • Just some fun

High Water Temperature

The right water temperature for Amano shrimps to thrive is between 18 and 27 degrees Celsius. Anywhere above or below will cause these shrimps to dig and hide in the substrates. Water temperature below the substrates is relatively warmer as the substrates help keep the water temperature adequate for the shrimps to survive.

Molting Can Be The Case

Molting is a critical phase for every shrimp. Amano shrimp often molt when they are young. Relentless consumption of algae and other leftovers in the tank helps them grow faster than other shrimps, which answers their frequent molting.

Whenever an Amano shrimp is about to molt, he may be anxious about other inhabitants of the tank, so it might dig and bury itself to hide. But digging and molting under the substrate isn’t a usual sight.

Intimidated By Other Fishes

Though Amano shrimps are more extensive than other shrimps like cherry and ghost shrimps, they too get scared from the bigger inhabitants in their tank. These bigger residents’ presence in the tank can also cause your Amano shrimps to fear its life and bury itself.

So you need to be careful when you are choosing mates for your Amano shrimps.

Lack Of Food

When it comes to feeding, Amano shrimps are extreme. They will devour almost every type of algae in your tank. However, to satiate their hunger, you need to feed them regularly and in full. If there’s a scarcity of food in their habitat, they will relentlessly look everywhere for food in the tank. So you will see your Amano shrimps trying to bury themselves in the substrates.

Loose substrates are known for growing algae. These substrates will provide suitable conditions for algae to grow and flourish in the tank. And your Amano shrimps are remarkable at smelling these algae. So, you will see your Amano shrimp diving into these nooks and corners to find their beloved dish.

No Plants In The Tank

The most common mistake newbie hobbyist make while keeping Amano is putting them in a tank with no plants. You shouldn’t do it, be it Amano shrimp or any other aquatic pets you have in your tank. You should try to mimic their original habitat in the wild.

Amanos, like every other shrimp, will need places to hide. Fishes, shrimps, and every other aquatics hide among the plants when there’s a threat in the tank. Primarily, little aquatics will hide in the plants when there’re bigger inhabitants living in the same tank.

In the wild, too, Amano shrimps hide below the pebbles and rocks when fewer plants are in their vicinity. So, if you see your Amano shrimps burying themselves, then you need to know that you need to include plants in your tank. It will be wise to learn the basic aquascaping and put live plants rather than getting fake plants for your Amano shrimp tank.

The Lights Are Too Bright

Yes, we like to make things bright in our aquarium. But do you want your aquatics to live 24/7 in bright lights inside their tank? As I mentioned earlier, it is necessary to mimic their habitat to calm and let them thrive.

Amano shrimps are diurnal, so they will sleep at night and feed during the day. Despite their relentless enthusiasm for feeding, they too need rest, and often the bright lights in the tank hamper their resting schedule. Therefore, your Amano shrimp bury themselves in the substrates.

It Could Be For Fun

Amano shrimps are fun to take care of as they require relatively less maintenance than other aquatics (unless you are trying to breed them in the tank). The reason behind them burying themselves could be for fun, too. It is often found that tanks, where there are sandy substrates, are where the Amano shrimps like to play and hide. You will often see a pair of Amano shrimps trying to play by burying themselves.

Do Shrimps Bury Themselves?

Yes, shrimps bury themselves when there’s danger from predators, or if the lights are too bright, to maintain body temperature and while searching for food. These are a few reasons, but it is quite common for shrimps to bury themselves.

Last Words On Do Amano Shrimp Bury Themselves

Usually, Amano shrimps are busy with feeding algae, but if you see them digging and burying themselves, something is off with their habitat. It could be because of less feeding, and they are searching for food, or it could be them hiding from the big inhabitants in the tank. However, suppose water parameters are out of suspicion. In that case, you need not worry because maybe your Amano shrimps are just playing and venturing unchartered territory in their tank. These could also be the underground sites in your tank.

Relevant Articles:

Are Ghost Shrimp Nocturnal? The Secret Dark Knight

Will Ghost Shrimp Eat Fish? Are They Scavengers of Predators?

Will Ghost Shrimp Eat Fry? Are They Cannibal?

rohit gurung author at urbanfishkeeping

About Rohit Gurung

My never-ending love and fascination with Aquascaping started when I received a red-eared turtle for my 10th birthday.

Apart from researching and writing, I spend hours gazing at my 3 turtles. And yeah, I bask alongside them too.